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Dansk

On being tested

We recommend that you take a test if you have symptoms that could be COVID-19 or if you are a close or 'secondary' contact of someone infected with novel coronavirus. There are other situations in which it would be a good idea to get tested.

Further information

What to do if you test positive for novel coronavirus

Important guidance if you have tested positive for novel coronavirus (short version)

When you are infected with novel coronavirus, you must…

What to do if you are a close contact of a person who has tested positive for novel coronavirus

Important guidance for close contacts (short version)

You should be tested if:

1. You have symptoms that could be COVID-19

Call your doctor if you feel so ill that you would like a consultation or if your symptoms worry you. You should also call the doctor if it concern a child under the age of 2.

However, if you have symptoms but do not feel so ill that you feel the need to consult your own doctor you can book a PCR test at coronaprover.dk yourself.

You should also get tested even though you have been fully vaccinated

2. You learn you are a close contact of someone who is infected with novel coronavirus 

If you are the close contact of someone infected with novel coronavirus, please call tel. 32 32 05 11 to determine which two days you need to be tested. Then you can proceed to book the two PCR test appointments on coronaprover.dk.

You should also get tested even though you have been fully vaccinated.

3. You are told to get tested prior to hospitalisation, treatment or examination

Ask your doctor, etc. if you have any questions.

You should also get tested even though you have been fully vaccinated.

4. You are told to get tested as part of infection detection measures

You may get asked to be tested in the event of an outbreak, for example in primary schools, daycare, nursing homes, etc. Please ask the local management if you have any questions.

You should also get tested even though you have been fully vaccinated.

5. You are identified as a 'secondary contact'

If you learn, for example through the Smitte│stop app, that you are a 'secondary contact', you must be tested as soon as possible. 

This typically happens in situations where – although you are not the primary or close contact of someone who has tested positive for novel coronavirus – you may have been exposed to infection because you have been working in too close proximity to your colleagues, for example.

As a secondary contact, you must book an appointment for a test on coronaprover.dk or take a rapid antigen test as soon as possible.

You do not have to self-isolate if you do not have any symptoms of COVID-19. But until you get your test results, you must limit the number of people you see and pay particular attention to the general infections prevention measures.

General guidance

You should also get tested even though you have been fully vaccinated.

6. When a rapid antigen test is a good idea

  • If your workplace or school offers you a rapid antigen test to prevent the spread of infection.
  • IIf you are going to be with someone who is at higher risk of severe illness from COVID-19.
  • If you cannot avoid being around many people.

On rapid antigen tests

1. What is a rapid antigen test?

A rapid antigen test is collected via nasal cavity swabs and can provide results within 15 minutes.

2. What are the benefits of rapid antigen tests?

A rapid antigen test provides quick results. Chains of infection can be broken more speedily because contract tracing and self-isolation can begin immediately. 

3. What are the drawbacks of rapid antigen tests?

Rapid tests are not as accurate as PCR tests. There may be a risk that you are indeed infected – even though you get a negative test result. Therefore, you should always comply with the general infection prevention guidance and be aware of symptoms, regardless of whether you have just been tested.

4. When is it a good idea to take a rapid antigen test?

  • If you cannot avoid being around many people.
  • If you need to be with someone who is at higher risk of severe illness from COVID-19.
  • If your workplace or school offers you a rapid antigen test to prevent the spread of infection.
  • If you learn that you are a 'secondary contact' because you have been close to an infected person, for example, at work.
 

5. Where can I take a rapid antigen test?

Free rapid antigen testing is available throughout Denmark in test centres as well as mobile test units. Some private providers offer rapid testing for a fee.

6. How often should I take the test?

A rapid antigen test provides a current ‘snapshot’– as does a PCR test. Test results will only tell you whether virus was present at the time you were tested. Even if your test result was negative, you should continue to follow the general infection prevention guidance. 

7. What should I do if my test is positive?

You should follow the guidelines that apply to people who are infected with novel coronavirus. You should, therefore, self-isolate immediately and pay particular attention to cleaning and hygiene. You must also inform your close contacts, and Coronaopsporing can help you do so (Tel. 32 32 05 11).

You can take a rapid antigen test, but we recommend that you take a PCR test instead because of the risk of getting a false negative result.

Learn more in

What to do if you are a close contact of a person who has tested positive for novel coronavirus

8. When do we use rapid antigen testing in Denmark?

We use rapid antigen testing to supplement our infection prevention efforts in keeping the epidemic under control. We regularly test healthcare professionals and large sections of the population – for example, young people, in areas where the virus is widespread.

Test results

You get your test results on the digital platform 

 

sundhed.dk

 

If virus was identified in the test sample, your test results are positive and the Danish text will read either:

  • Positive (positive)
  • Formodet positiv (presumed positive)
  • Påvist (detected)

If virus was not identified in the test sample, the Danish text will read either:

  • Negativ (negative)
  • Ikke påvist (not detected)
Updated 04 FEB 2021